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Southland corsets wholesale couples get married on a most memorable day
Peter Chen, new to America, found corsets wholesale http://www.corsets-wholesale.com/ Winnie Liu on Skype as he searched for kindred souls living nearby in Los Angeles.

They texted. They met for a meal at a mall. They fell long gown dress http://www.longgowndress.com in love — and somehow 71/2 years slid by.

On Wednesday, 12/12/12, they wed at the bustling county clerk's office in Norwalk, where couple after couple came in to get hitched on the last date this century featuring the same number for the day, the month and the year.

Photos: sfdgfghgjng 12/12/12 wedding day

"It's about time," Liu said as she straightened his bow tie. "It's too late," said Chen, by which he meant he shouldn't have taken so long to ask.

Anyway, they agreed that they'd chosen a most memorable day, an idea cribbed from friends who had tied the knot on 11/11/11.

He wore a tux. She wore an ethereal purple dress and sparkling silver pumps. They took turns carrying a shopping bag full of Godiva chocolate bars — specially labeled with their photo, names and the date. They gave bars to friends and strangers alike as they waited nervously for their 9 a.m. civil ceremony.

Full coverage: City Beat

Inside the chapel, Liu cried as she stood beneath a pink and white arbor of faux flowers. Chen needed cajoling before he shook off his shyness, pursed his lips and gave his bride a quick public kiss.

Chen, 38, came to the United States in 2001. He is an engineer who helped design the 3-D cameras used for "Avatar" and "Titanic." Liu, 27, arrived in 2005 and works for a massive fashion trade show.

Some of their co-workers came to watch them marry Wednesday, but their families were absent. The Lius, who own an Asian fusion restaurant in the City of Industry, and the Chens, who are retired and split their time between Southern California and Taiwan, already had flown overseas to prepare elaborate wedding celebrations.

After the ceremony, in fact, the happy couple had to rush home to Culver City to pack. They were due to spend their wedding night on a flight to Taiwan, where Chen's family will throw a dinner for 30. Then they'll travel to China for the grand Liu family affair.

On Dec. 28 in Guangzhou, Liu said, she'll wear a white wedding dress, followed by a red dress and two evening gowns. A whole pig will be served at each table. Two hundred guests are invited.

Hundreds also came Wednesday to celebrate weddings in Norwalk. Many couples had booked their slots in September. Others jumped on board in the last few days, when the county clerk's office extended hours and opened extra chapels to meet demand.

It seemed fitting that Rosa Villa and Luis Flores, both 45, should get married on a singular date. The Long Beach pair, who met in high school and have been together for a decade, share a birthday: Sept. 14, 1967.

They finally decided this fall that it was time, and walked into the county clerk's office Thursday, 10/11/12, in jeans — planning to get it done fast and then go see a movie. But the day was all booked. And when family members discovered the foiled elopement, they insisted both on being present and in dress-up clothes.

Like Liu and Chen, Villa and Flores were married by John Pulice, 81, who asked them if they had any words they wanted to say to each other.

"Just I love you," said Flores, wearing a crisp black suit. "And I return the love right back," said Villa, dressed in white.

That was the real wedding moment, not the joking ones afterward when Flores declared that a piece of paper was nothing more than that and Villa zinged back: "Now I can say, `Pull the plug.'"

Pulice, a former school superintendent, has been marrying people as a volunteer officiant for the last 14 years. He's been married himself long enough to boast five children, 10 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

On Wednesday, in his sky blue chapel, he presided at the wedding of Ariel Serrano, 38, and Maria Ignacio, 42, who have been together eight years.

They hated each other when they first met, working at an alarm company office in Van Nuys, Serrano said. He asked her to do something for him. She said it wasn't her job. They glared back and forth for years — and when she got transferred, he threw a pizza party to celebrate. Then she transferred back, the glaciers melted and time passed.

"Sorry it took so long. I love you," Serrano told Ignacio, to which Pulice replied that those words "cover a lot of territory."

"You know I've been married 61 years," he told the beaming newlyweds, "and we still say, `I love you' every day."
Southland corsets wholesale couples get married on a most memorable day Peter Chen, new to America, found corsets wholesale http://www.corsets-wholesale.com/ Winnie Liu on Skype as he searched for kindred souls living nearby in Los Angeles. They texted. They met for a meal at a mall. They fell long gown dress http://www.longgowndress.com in love — and somehow 71/2 years slid by. On Wednesday, 12/12/12, they wed at the bustling county clerk's office in Norwalk, where couple after couple came in to get hitched on the last date this century featuring the same number for the day, the month and the year. Photos: sfdgfghgjng 12/12/12 wedding day "It's about time," Liu said as she straightened his bow tie. "It's too late," said Chen, by which he meant he shouldn't have taken so long to ask. Anyway, they agreed that they'd chosen a most memorable day, an idea cribbed from friends who had tied the knot on 11/11/11. He wore a tux. She wore an ethereal purple dress and sparkling silver pumps. They took turns carrying a shopping bag full of Godiva chocolate bars — specially labeled with their photo, names and the date. They gave bars to friends and strangers alike as they waited nervously for their 9 a.m. civil ceremony. Full coverage: City Beat Inside the chapel, Liu cried as she stood beneath a pink and white arbor of faux flowers. Chen needed cajoling before he shook off his shyness, pursed his lips and gave his bride a quick public kiss. Chen, 38, came to the United States in 2001. He is an engineer who helped design the 3-D cameras used for "Avatar" and "Titanic." Liu, 27, arrived in 2005 and works for a massive fashion trade show. Some of their co-workers came to watch them marry Wednesday, but their families were absent. The Lius, who own an Asian fusion restaurant in the City of Industry, and the Chens, who are retired and split their time between Southern California and Taiwan, already had flown overseas to prepare elaborate wedding celebrations. After the ceremony, in fact, the happy couple had to rush home to Culver City to pack. They were due to spend their wedding night on a flight to Taiwan, where Chen's family will throw a dinner for 30. Then they'll travel to China for the grand Liu family affair. On Dec. 28 in Guangzhou, Liu said, she'll wear a white wedding dress, followed by a red dress and two evening gowns. A whole pig will be served at each table. Two hundred guests are invited. Hundreds also came Wednesday to celebrate weddings in Norwalk. Many couples had booked their slots in September. Others jumped on board in the last few days, when the county clerk's office extended hours and opened extra chapels to meet demand. It seemed fitting that Rosa Villa and Luis Flores, both 45, should get married on a singular date. The Long Beach pair, who met in high school and have been together for a decade, share a birthday: Sept. 14, 1967. They finally decided this fall that it was time, and walked into the county clerk's office Thursday, 10/11/12, in jeans — planning to get it done fast and then go see a movie. But the day was all booked. And when family members discovered the foiled elopement, they insisted both on being present and in dress-up clothes. Like Liu and Chen, Villa and Flores were married by John Pulice, 81, who asked them if they had any words they wanted to say to each other. "Just I love you," said Flores, wearing a crisp black suit. "And I return the love right back," said Villa, dressed in white. That was the real wedding moment, not the joking ones afterward when Flores declared that a piece of paper was nothing more than that and Villa zinged back: "Now I can say, `Pull the plug.'" Pulice, a former school superintendent, has been marrying people as a volunteer officiant for the last 14 years. He's been married himself long enough to boast five children, 10 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. On Wednesday, in his sky blue chapel, he presided at the wedding of Ariel Serrano, 38, and Maria Ignacio, 42, who have been together eight years. They hated each other when they first met, working at an alarm company office in Van Nuys, Serrano said. He asked her to do something for him. She said it wasn't her job. They glared back and forth for years — and when she got transferred, he threw a pizza party to celebrate. Then she transferred back, the glaciers melted and time passed. "Sorry it took so long. I love you," Serrano told Ignacio, to which Pulice replied that those words "cover a lot of territory." "You know I've been married 61 years," he told the beaming newlyweds, "and we still say, `I love you' every day."
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  • Sudan wholesale halloween costumes Court to Define Indecent Dress for Women


    NAIROBI, wholesale halloween costumes http://www.wholesale-halloweencostumes.com/ Kenya — This is not about pants, Lubna Hussein insists. It is about principles.

    A woman should be able Halloween Costumes Outlet http://www.bnsds.com/ to wear what she wants and not be publicly whipped for it, says Mrs. Hussein, a defiant Sudanese journalist, and on Monday her belief will be put to the test.

    Mrs. Hussein has been charged in Khartoum, Sudan's capital, with indecent dress, a crime that carries a $100 fine and 40 lashings. She was arrested in July, along with 12 other women, who were caught at a cafe wearing trousers.

    Sudan is partially ruled by Islamic sfdgfghgjng law, which emphasizes modest dress for women. Mrs. Hussein, 34, has pleaded not guilty and is daring the Sudanese authorities to punish her.

    "I am Muslim; I understand Muslim law," Mrs. Hussein said in an interview. "But I ask: what passage in the Koran says women can't wear pants? This is not nice."

    Continue reading the main storyMrs. Hussein even printed up invitation cards for her initial court date in July and sent out e-mail messages asking people to witness her whipping, if it came to that. She said she wanted the world to see how Sudan treated women.

    Continue reading the main story Hundreds of Sudanese women — many wearing pants — swarmed in front of the court where the trial was supposed to take place, protesting that the law was unfair. Twice now, the trial has been postponed. Some of the other women arrested with Mrs. Hussein have pleaded guilty and were lashed as a result. Past floggings have been carried out with plastic whips that leave permanent scars.

    "The flogging, yes, it causes pain," Mrs. Hussein said. "But more important, it is an insult. This is why I want to change the law."

    The law in contention here is Article 152 of Sudan's penal code. Concisely stated, the law says that up to 40 lashes and a fine should be assessed anyone "who commits an indecent act which violates public morality or wears indecent clothing."

    The question is: what exactly is indecent clothing?

    In Sudan, some women wear veils and loose fitting dresses; others do not. Northern Sudanese, who are mostly Muslim, are supposed to obey Islamic law, while southern Sudanese, who are mostly Christian, are not. Mrs. Hussein argues that Article 152 is intentionally vague, in part to punish women.

    Photo Lubna Hussein with supporters gathering outside the court in Khartoum upon her arrival for a hearing on Friday. Credit Ashraf Shazly/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images Rabie A. Atti, a Sudanese government spokesman, said the law was meant for the opposite reason, to "protect the people."

    "We have an act controlling the behavior of women and men so the behavior doesn't harm others, whether it's speech or dress or et cetera," he said.

    But, he insisted, Mrs. Hussein must have done something else to run afoul of the authorities, besides wearing pants.

    Thank you for subscribing. An error has occurred. Please try again later. You are already subscribed to this email. View all New York Times newsletters.

    See Sample Manage Email Preferences Not you? Privacy Policy Opt out or contact us anytime "You come to Khartoum and you will see for yourself," he said. "Many women, in offices and wedding ceremonies, wear trousers."

    Continue reading the main story"Thousands of girls wear the trousers," he added.

    Asked what other offenses Mrs. Hussein may have committed, Mr. Atti said that the case file was secret and that he did not know.

    Mrs. Hussein countered that she did not do anything else that might have violated the law, and that countless people from inside and outside Sudan are supporting her.

    "It's well known that Sudanese women are pioneers in the history of women's rights in this region, and that we won our rights a long time ago because of our awareness, open mind, good culture and struggle," she said.

    The last time Sudan's courts handled a case that attracted such international attention, they found a compromise solution. A British schoolteacher faced up to 40 lashes and six months in prison for allowing her students to name a class teddy bear Muhammad, which was perceived as an insult to Islam. But after being sentenced to 15 days in jail, she was soon pardoned by the Sudanese president.

    A widow with no children, Mrs. Hussein is a career journalist who recently worked as a public information assistant for the United Nations in Sudan. She quit, she said, because she did not want to get the United Nations embroiled in her case. But Sudan, given its renewed interest in normalizing relations with the United States, might be reluctant to draw much international ire by harshly punishing her.

    Protesters are expected to come out on her behalf again when Mrs. Hussein returns to court Monday morning. She says her family is also behind her.

    "My mother supports me," she said, "but she is worried for me and prays for me."
    Sudan wholesale halloween costumes Court to Define Indecent Dress for Women NAIROBI, wholesale halloween costumes http://www.wholesale-halloweencostumes.com/ Kenya — This is not about pants, Lubna Hussein insists. It is about principles. A woman should be able Halloween Costumes Outlet http://www.bnsds.com/ to wear what she wants and not be publicly whipped for it, says Mrs. Hussein, a defiant Sudanese journalist, and on Monday her belief will be put to the test. Mrs. Hussein has been charged in Khartoum, Sudan's capital, with indecent dress, a crime that carries a $100 fine and 40 lashings. She was arrested in July, along with 12 other women, who were caught at a cafe wearing trousers. Sudan is partially ruled by Islamic sfdgfghgjng law, which emphasizes modest dress for women. Mrs. Hussein, 34, has pleaded not guilty and is daring the Sudanese authorities to punish her. "I am Muslim; I understand Muslim law," Mrs. Hussein said in an interview. "But I ask: what passage in the Koran says women can't wear pants? This is not nice." Continue reading the main storyMrs. Hussein even printed up invitation cards for her initial court date in July and sent out e-mail messages asking people to witness her whipping, if it came to that. She said she wanted the world to see how Sudan treated women. Continue reading the main story Hundreds of Sudanese women — many wearing pants — swarmed in front of the court where the trial was supposed to take place, protesting that the law was unfair. Twice now, the trial has been postponed. Some of the other women arrested with Mrs. Hussein have pleaded guilty and were lashed as a result. Past floggings have been carried out with plastic whips that leave permanent scars. "The flogging, yes, it causes pain," Mrs. Hussein said. "But more important, it is an insult. This is why I want to change the law." The law in contention here is Article 152 of Sudan's penal code. Concisely stated, the law says that up to 40 lashes and a fine should be assessed anyone "who commits an indecent act which violates public morality or wears indecent clothing." The question is: what exactly is indecent clothing? In Sudan, some women wear veils and loose fitting dresses; others do not. Northern Sudanese, who are mostly Muslim, are supposed to obey Islamic law, while southern Sudanese, who are mostly Christian, are not. Mrs. Hussein argues that Article 152 is intentionally vague, in part to punish women. Photo Lubna Hussein with supporters gathering outside the court in Khartoum upon her arrival for a hearing on Friday. Credit Ashraf Shazly/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images Rabie A. Atti, a Sudanese government spokesman, said the law was meant for the opposite reason, to "protect the people." "We have an act controlling the behavior of women and men so the behavior doesn't harm others, whether it's speech or dress or et cetera," he said. But, he insisted, Mrs. Hussein must have done something else to run afoul of the authorities, besides wearing pants. Thank you for subscribing. An error has occurred. Please try again later. You are already subscribed to this email. View all New York Times newsletters. See Sample Manage Email Preferences Not you? Privacy Policy Opt out or contact us anytime "You come to Khartoum and you will see for yourself," he said. "Many women, in offices and wedding ceremonies, wear trousers." Continue reading the main story"Thousands of girls wear the trousers," he added. Asked what other offenses Mrs. Hussein may have committed, Mr. Atti said that the case file was secret and that he did not know. Mrs. Hussein countered that she did not do anything else that might have violated the law, and that countless people from inside and outside Sudan are supporting her. "It's well known that Sudanese women are pioneers in the history of women's rights in this region, and that we won our rights a long time ago because of our awareness, open mind, good culture and struggle," she said. The last time Sudan's courts handled a case that attracted such international attention, they found a compromise solution. A British schoolteacher faced up to 40 lashes and six months in prison for allowing her students to name a class teddy bear Muhammad, which was perceived as an insult to Islam. But after being sentenced to 15 days in jail, she was soon pardoned by the Sudanese president. A widow with no children, Mrs. Hussein is a career journalist who recently worked as a public information assistant for the United Nations in Sudan. She quit, she said, because she did not want to get the United Nations embroiled in her case. But Sudan, given its renewed interest in normalizing relations with the United States, might be reluctant to draw much international ire by harshly punishing her. Protesters are expected to come out on her behalf again when Mrs. Hussein returns to court Monday morning. She says her family is also behind her. "My mother supports me," she said, "but she is worried for me and prays for me."
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  • Policing Sexy Clubwear of Clothes in Sudan’s South Reflects a Culture Clash

    JUBA, Sudan — Joseph Lubega Sexy Clubwear http://www.lover-beauty.com/Sexy-clubwear/ and his wife were strolling through a popular part of town, doing some shopping over the Christmas weekend, when a uniformed police officer approached and slapped his wife across the face, he said. The officer slapped her again. Then one more time.

    "The reason, he Wholesale Babydoll Lingerie http://www.lover-beauty.com/babydoll-and-chemise/ said, was the blouse," said Mr. Lubega, a motorcycle driver from Uganda working here in the southern Sudanese capital. "It had an open back."

    Southern Sudan is scheduled to hold a landmark referendum next month on whether to declare independence, after decades of civil war, from the northern part of the country, which is mostly Arab and heavily Islamic.

    The sfdgfghgjng struggle against Islamic law became a focal point of the war for the mostly Christian and animist southerners, who say they were brutalized under the north.

    Continue reading the main story"In southern Sudan, you can dress in anything," said Information Minister Benjamin Marial, addressing the attacks and threats by southern Sudanese police officers on civilians over the way they are dressed.

    Continue reading the main story "Everyone is free," Mr. Marial said.

    But for some women in Juba, the run-ins with the police have been an unwelcome reminder that cultural norms and freedoms here are still up for debate.

    Many of the attacks have been committed by newly minted members of southern Sudan's police force, thousands of whom graduated this month from training courses supported by the United Nations.

    Photo A policeman in Abyei, Sudan. To the south, some officers are cracking down on Western dress. Credit Shannon Jensen for The New York Times The new cadets took to the streets of the southern capital, Juba, whistling amid traffic jams in brand-new uniforms and surveying the growing crowds. Soon after, around Christmas, the first cases of abuse were reported, often concerning women wearing shorts and miniskirts.

    Mr. Marial tried to reassure the public that offenses by the police were sporadic and unwarranted, and that the offending officers had been reprimanded.

    "This is not the policy of the government of southern Sudan, and we have taken the preliminary measures," he said.

    Thank you for subscribing. An error has occurred. Please try again later. You are already subscribed to this email. View all New York Times newsletters.

    See Sample Manage Email Preferences Not you? Privacy Policy Opt out or contact us anytime "Sometimes police get out of control," Mr. Marial added. "These were individuals."

    But cultural clashes come in many varieties, and sometimes involve foreigners as well. On Wednesday, a German woman who had ventured out was ordered home by an un-uniformed man for wearing a dress he considered too revealing.

    The man warned, " 'If I see you like that pass here again, I will take you,' " said the German woman, who asked not to be named out of fear of retribution.

    An officer in the southern Sudanese Army with knowledge of the abuses, who asked not to be named because he was speaking outside the mandate of his job, said that the police had been advised to "counsel" women on their dress, and that the officers had "mistaken the advice they were given."

    Continue reading the main storyWhile government officials here have stressed that the actions by the police were unsanctioned and a mistake, enforcing standards of appearance seems to be common.

    "Police have arrested women and girls for their dress on many occasions," says Jehanne Henry, a researcher for Human Rights Watch, which issued a report on the matter in 2009. According to Ms. Henry, individual police commissioners in the past had authorized arrests of people with "bad behavior," which also included men wearing low-slung jeans and those with dreadlocks.
    Policing Sexy Clubwear of Clothes in Sudan’s South Reflects a Culture Clash JUBA, Sudan — Joseph Lubega Sexy Clubwear http://www.lover-beauty.com/Sexy-clubwear/ and his wife were strolling through a popular part of town, doing some shopping over the Christmas weekend, when a uniformed police officer approached and slapped his wife across the face, he said. The officer slapped her again. Then one more time. "The reason, he Wholesale Babydoll Lingerie http://www.lover-beauty.com/babydoll-and-chemise/ said, was the blouse," said Mr. Lubega, a motorcycle driver from Uganda working here in the southern Sudanese capital. "It had an open back." Southern Sudan is scheduled to hold a landmark referendum next month on whether to declare independence, after decades of civil war, from the northern part of the country, which is mostly Arab and heavily Islamic. The sfdgfghgjng struggle against Islamic law became a focal point of the war for the mostly Christian and animist southerners, who say they were brutalized under the north. Continue reading the main story"In southern Sudan, you can dress in anything," said Information Minister Benjamin Marial, addressing the attacks and threats by southern Sudanese police officers on civilians over the way they are dressed. Continue reading the main story "Everyone is free," Mr. Marial said. But for some women in Juba, the run-ins with the police have been an unwelcome reminder that cultural norms and freedoms here are still up for debate. Many of the attacks have been committed by newly minted members of southern Sudan's police force, thousands of whom graduated this month from training courses supported by the United Nations. Photo A policeman in Abyei, Sudan. To the south, some officers are cracking down on Western dress. Credit Shannon Jensen for The New York Times The new cadets took to the streets of the southern capital, Juba, whistling amid traffic jams in brand-new uniforms and surveying the growing crowds. Soon after, around Christmas, the first cases of abuse were reported, often concerning women wearing shorts and miniskirts. Mr. Marial tried to reassure the public that offenses by the police were sporadic and unwarranted, and that the offending officers had been reprimanded. "This is not the policy of the government of southern Sudan, and we have taken the preliminary measures," he said. Thank you for subscribing. An error has occurred. Please try again later. You are already subscribed to this email. View all New York Times newsletters. See Sample Manage Email Preferences Not you? Privacy Policy Opt out or contact us anytime "Sometimes police get out of control," Mr. Marial added. "These were individuals." But cultural clashes come in many varieties, and sometimes involve foreigners as well. On Wednesday, a German woman who had ventured out was ordered home by an un-uniformed man for wearing a dress he considered too revealing. The man warned, " 'If I see you like that pass here again, I will take you,' " said the German woman, who asked not to be named out of fear of retribution. An officer in the southern Sudanese Army with knowledge of the abuses, who asked not to be named because he was speaking outside the mandate of his job, said that the police had been advised to "counsel" women on their dress, and that the officers had "mistaken the advice they were given." Continue reading the main storyWhile government officials here have stressed that the actions by the police were unsanctioned and a mistake, enforcing standards of appearance seems to be common. "Police have arrested women and girls for their dress on many occasions," says Jehanne Henry, a researcher for Human Rights Watch, which issued a report on the matter in 2009. According to Ms. Henry, individual police commissioners in the past had authorized arrests of people with "bad behavior," which also included men wearing low-slung jeans and those with dreadlocks.
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  • Southland corsets wholesale couples get married on a most memorable day
    Peter Chen, new to America, found corsets wholesale http://www.corsets-wholesale.com/ Winnie Liu on Skype as he searched for kindred souls living nearby in Los Angeles.

    They texted. They met for a meal at a mall. They fell long gown dress http://www.longgowndress.com in love — and somehow 71/2 years slid by.

    On Wednesday, 12/12/12, they wed at the bustling county clerk's office in Norwalk, where couple after couple came in to get hitched on the last date this century featuring the same number for the day, the month and the year.

    Photos: sfdgfghgjng 12/12/12 wedding day

    "It's about time," Liu said as she straightened his bow tie. "It's too late," said Chen, by which he meant he shouldn't have taken so long to ask.

    Anyway, they agreed that they'd chosen a most memorable day, an idea cribbed from friends who had tied the knot on 11/11/11.

    He wore a tux. She wore an ethereal purple dress and sparkling silver pumps. They took turns carrying a shopping bag full of Godiva chocolate bars — specially labeled with their photo, names and the date. They gave bars to friends and strangers alike as they waited nervously for their 9 a.m. civil ceremony.

    Full coverage: City Beat

    Inside the chapel, Liu cried as she stood beneath a pink and white arbor of faux flowers. Chen needed cajoling before he shook off his shyness, pursed his lips and gave his bride a quick public kiss.

    Chen, 38, came to the United States in 2001. He is an engineer who helped design the 3-D cameras used for "Avatar" and "Titanic." Liu, 27, arrived in 2005 and works for a massive fashion trade show.

    Some of their co-workers came to watch them marry Wednesday, but their families were absent. The Lius, who own an Asian fusion restaurant in the City of Industry, and the Chens, who are retired and split their time between Southern California and Taiwan, already had flown overseas to prepare elaborate wedding celebrations.

    After the ceremony, in fact, the happy couple had to rush home to Culver City to pack. They were due to spend their wedding night on a flight to Taiwan, where Chen's family will throw a dinner for 30. Then they'll travel to China for the grand Liu family affair.

    On Dec. 28 in Guangzhou, Liu said, she'll wear a white wedding dress, followed by a red dress and two evening gowns. A whole pig will be served at each table. Two hundred guests are invited.

    Hundreds also came Wednesday to celebrate weddings in Norwalk. Many couples had booked their slots in September. Others jumped on board in the last few days, when the county clerk's office extended hours and opened extra chapels to meet demand.

    It seemed fitting that Rosa Villa and Luis Flores, both 45, should get married on a singular date. The Long Beach pair, who met in high school and have been together for a decade, share a birthday: Sept. 14, 1967.

    They finally decided this fall that it was time, and walked into the county clerk's office Thursday, 10/11/12, in jeans — planning to get it done fast and then go see a movie. But the day was all booked. And when family members discovered the foiled elopement, they insisted both on being present and in dress-up clothes.

    Like Liu and Chen, Villa and Flores were married by John Pulice, 81, who asked them if they had any words they wanted to say to each other.

    "Just I love you," said Flores, wearing a crisp black suit. "And I return the love right back," said Villa, dressed in white.

    That was the real wedding moment, not the joking ones afterward when Flores declared that a piece of paper was nothing more than that and Villa zinged back: "Now I can say, `Pull the plug.'"

    Pulice, a former school superintendent, has been marrying people as a volunteer officiant for the last 14 years. He's been married himself long enough to boast five children, 10 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

    On Wednesday, in his sky blue chapel, he presided at the wedding of Ariel Serrano, 38, and Maria Ignacio, 42, who have been together eight years.

    They hated each other when they first met, working at an alarm company office in Van Nuys, Serrano said. He asked her to do something for him. She said it wasn't her job. They glared back and forth for years — and when she got transferred, he threw a pizza party to celebrate. Then she transferred back, the glaciers melted and time passed.

    "Sorry it took so long. I love you," Serrano told Ignacio, to which Pulice replied that those words "cover a lot of territory."

    "You know I've been married 61 years," he told the beaming newlyweds, "and we still say, `I love you' every day."
    Southland corsets wholesale couples get married on a most memorable day Peter Chen, new to America, found corsets wholesale http://www.corsets-wholesale.com/ Winnie Liu on Skype as he searched for kindred souls living nearby in Los Angeles. They texted. They met for a meal at a mall. They fell long gown dress http://www.longgowndress.com in love — and somehow 71/2 years slid by. On Wednesday, 12/12/12, they wed at the bustling county clerk's office in Norwalk, where couple after couple came in to get hitched on the last date this century featuring the same number for the day, the month and the year. Photos: sfdgfghgjng 12/12/12 wedding day "It's about time," Liu said as she straightened his bow tie. "It's too late," said Chen, by which he meant he shouldn't have taken so long to ask. Anyway, they agreed that they'd chosen a most memorable day, an idea cribbed from friends who had tied the knot on 11/11/11. He wore a tux. She wore an ethereal purple dress and sparkling silver pumps. They took turns carrying a shopping bag full of Godiva chocolate bars — specially labeled with their photo, names and the date. They gave bars to friends and strangers alike as they waited nervously for their 9 a.m. civil ceremony. Full coverage: City Beat Inside the chapel, Liu cried as she stood beneath a pink and white arbor of faux flowers. Chen needed cajoling before he shook off his shyness, pursed his lips and gave his bride a quick public kiss. Chen, 38, came to the United States in 2001. He is an engineer who helped design the 3-D cameras used for "Avatar" and "Titanic." Liu, 27, arrived in 2005 and works for a massive fashion trade show. Some of their co-workers came to watch them marry Wednesday, but their families were absent. The Lius, who own an Asian fusion restaurant in the City of Industry, and the Chens, who are retired and split their time between Southern California and Taiwan, already had flown overseas to prepare elaborate wedding celebrations. After the ceremony, in fact, the happy couple had to rush home to Culver City to pack. They were due to spend their wedding night on a flight to Taiwan, where Chen's family will throw a dinner for 30. Then they'll travel to China for the grand Liu family affair. On Dec. 28 in Guangzhou, Liu said, she'll wear a white wedding dress, followed by a red dress and two evening gowns. A whole pig will be served at each table. Two hundred guests are invited. Hundreds also came Wednesday to celebrate weddings in Norwalk. Many couples had booked their slots in September. Others jumped on board in the last few days, when the county clerk's office extended hours and opened extra chapels to meet demand. It seemed fitting that Rosa Villa and Luis Flores, both 45, should get married on a singular date. The Long Beach pair, who met in high school and have been together for a decade, share a birthday: Sept. 14, 1967. They finally decided this fall that it was time, and walked into the county clerk's office Thursday, 10/11/12, in jeans — planning to get it done fast and then go see a movie. But the day was all booked. And when family members discovered the foiled elopement, they insisted both on being present and in dress-up clothes. Like Liu and Chen, Villa and Flores were married by John Pulice, 81, who asked them if they had any words they wanted to say to each other. "Just I love you," said Flores, wearing a crisp black suit. "And I return the love right back," said Villa, dressed in white. That was the real wedding moment, not the joking ones afterward when Flores declared that a piece of paper was nothing more than that and Villa zinged back: "Now I can say, `Pull the plug.'" Pulice, a former school superintendent, has been marrying people as a volunteer officiant for the last 14 years. He's been married himself long enough to boast five children, 10 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. On Wednesday, in his sky blue chapel, he presided at the wedding of Ariel Serrano, 38, and Maria Ignacio, 42, who have been together eight years. They hated each other when they first met, working at an alarm company office in Van Nuys, Serrano said. He asked her to do something for him. She said it wasn't her job. They glared back and forth for years — and when she got transferred, he threw a pizza party to celebrate. Then she transferred back, the glaciers melted and time passed. "Sorry it took so long. I love you," Serrano told Ignacio, to which Pulice replied that those words "cover a lot of territory." "You know I've been married 61 years," he told the beaming newlyweds, "and we still say, `I love you' every day."
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